DIY camera tilt

bitcraft
My last event had a ton of young children and it was pretty time consuming to manually adjust the tilt of my camera to include them. I decided that I wanted to do something about it, but the commercial options seemed a bit expensive for what I needed. Last Sunday, I rummaged around and built a motorized tilt out of spare parts. I uses an old door hinge, some wood blocks, aluminum wire, an arduino and old RC servo. Total cost was $0! I estimate that cost of buying new parts would be about $25-$30. Replacing the arduino with a potentiometer and 555 timer would save the headache of programming the arduino and save about $10 as well.



My booth uses an arduino for reading switches, so I used that to control the servo as well. Right now the servo is controlled by the keyboard. I'm considering ways to control it through software or maybe a potentiometer or joystick mounted on the photo booth.



It's only about 70% complete and looks pretty rough, but I will be making it more robust in the next week or so as I get time.

Comments

  • 7 Comments sorted by Votes Date Added
  • Mike
    Very cool love the Arduinos. Been using the netduinos here lately. Use a lot in prototypes
  • socialbooth
    That's brilliant.



    I have an Arduino kit with a servo and thought about doing the same but then I lost the will to live when I figured out I couldn't program it after numerous attempts :)



    I'd love to see/read/hear/learn how you've incorporated it into your booths
  • Minh
    you guys are speaking french to me. lol i dont even know waht that arduino is
  • bitcraft
    Quick update, I still use this setup (cleaned up a bit), though I don't have any pictures of it right now. The arduino control was a bit ambitious and I haven't had the time to program a control interface on the computer, so i've just decided to use a 555 timer and potentiometer instead. The analog feel of it is really nice. It has worked pretty well for the few months i've used it, but the servo is old (10+ years!) and is getting slower each event I use it. I'll have to replace it this winter, I think.
  • EZ-Photo Booth
    I have the solution!



    I am using an arduino uno r3, servo and 2 push buttons to control up and down.



    The raw code and instructions can be found at this link.

    http://blog.richard-potter.co.uk/2009/11/servo-control-with-an-arduino-board/



    The delay will control how long before the button tells the servo to move again.



    Here is a link to a picture of the breadboard

    http://img10.imageshack.us/img10/7007/gxuj.jpg



    Here is a picture of the arduino wired to the breadboard

    http://img23.imageshack.us/img23/6218/a3ml.jpg



    Here is a picture of how it is wired to the arduino

    http://img812.imageshack.us/img812/6148/yg41.jpg
  • bitcraft
    Hope I don't offend anyone by resurrecting this ancient thread!  I uploaded a video of my camera tilt working with my custom touch screen photo booth software.  The quality isn't so good since I just snapped it with my phone, and the interface is just used for debugging...the customer won't see the exact screen that is used in the video.

    Just so you know what you are watching, I have an arduino controlling a servo that tilts the camera.  The camera is tilted by simply opening up the camera preview and dragging your finder up or down, just like you would on a smart phone.  As you move your finger up or down, the live preview is updated and you can watch the camera tilt.  Its a lot of fun to play with!

    If you watch closely, you'll notice the camera movement isn't very smooth in the video...I've improved the interface and made it liquid smooth since then.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0ahI_7RA0c

    @ez-photo-booth, nice work!  Have you gotten the buttons mounted in your photobooth yet?
  • david-janaskie
    Ok...that is very cool.  I need to look into implementing that.
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